Elvis is Alive

Thursday in southern France was still a bit chilly and we decamped early for the cross-Spain leg.

The Open Road

The Open Road

Its easy driving on the largely empty roads which only get busy round the big cities.

Spanish town at 58 mph

Spanish town at 58 mph

We crossed Spain in a blur of pretty towns and largely deserted countryside. It is 370 miles and 8 hours from the French border to Valencia. We spent some of the time listening to Brooklyn, the 2009 novel by Colm Toibin about an Irish girl who emigrates to New York.

Mavis and Nia parked by the entrance to Valencia Camper Park

Mavis and Nia parked by the entrance to Valencia Camper Park

Our first night in Spain was at Valencia Camper Park. This is a good site just to the north of Valencia. This is ideal for a night-halt and also a handy base for visiting Valencia; there is a rail link to the city centre with a station 300 metres away.
As we were just staying over night we parked outside the campsite for the aire rate of 10 euros a night.

SunriseValencia

The early morning Valencian dog walk coincided with sunrise.

El Fondo  Natural Park

El Fondo Natural Park

The next day we drove the 137 miles down to Camping Marjal Costa Blanca, near Alicante. This is one of our favourite sites and we know a few friends here now among the long stay expats.

Stonechat

Stonechat

Flock of Ibis

Flock of Ibis

There is a good nature reserve about a mile away and we cycle here most days with the Krays, then walk round the lakes.

Ibis

Ibis

Egret taking off.

Egret taking off.

Female Stonechat

Female Stonechat

Swamp Hen

Swamp Hen

I think the proper name is Purple Gallinule

Stork

Stork

Marsh Harrier over El Fondo

Marsh Harrier over El Fondo

Cormorant

Cormorant

Lesser Spotted Peter

Lesser Spotted Peter

There are a few birds around at the moment. Some prettier than others.

Are we in a movie?

Are we in a movie?

Back at Marjal we came across this police car….it seems to have crossed the state line.

Not sure if there is any connection but a couple of days later Elvis appeared…all the way from Memphis…for a brilliant performance of all the old greats. We watched him over supper in the dining room attached to the campsite.

Elvis

Elvis

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Posted in - Spain, 2016 Spring, Alicante, Valencia

Sword Beach to Hendaye Plage

Day 2

Day 2

On Tuesday we woke to a chilly 2 deg C in Ouistreham and after a brief but bracing walk on Sword beach, (one of the the D-day landing beaches, just by the aire) set off south. We landed at the Futuroscope Aire near Poitiers, about half way down France, by evening. Futuroscope is a French theme park with 3D films, and other multimedia stuff. It looked good but we thought we would visit the theme park itself another day when it was warmer.

Sunrise at Futuroscope

Sunrise at Futuroscope

These are the sculptures which guard the entrance to the theme park.

Futuroscope

Futuroscope

The way in to futuroscope.

Aire at Hendaye Plage

Aire at Hendaye Plage

A wet Hendaye Plage was the next stop. This is a coastal town in the SW of France, very close to the Spanish border. We spent the night at the aire here, about a half mile from the beach. The aire has been smartened up since we last visited with our friends Bob and Mirv, about 3 years ago, and is now fitted with a barrier and a ten euro entrance charge.

Basque Country

Basque Country

This is Basque country and the road names all have Basque and French versions.

Hendaye Plage Seafront

Hendaye Plage Seafront

We walked down to the seafront and watched the waves trying to jump in to the road. The building in the distance is the old casino. Closed for gambling now I think but we had a nice glass of wine here on the last visit, on their terrace.

The Old Casino

The Old Casino

We plan to drive across Spain tomorrow…the forecast is not good for Portugal for the next few days..

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Posted in 2016 Spring, Aquitaine, hendaye plage

Seagulls Flying Backwards Today

The M6

The M6

After a great Christmas we are the road again. Storm Imogen chased us down the M6 and over the channel.

Travel Seat

Travel Seat

Penny’s favourite seat….best used when I’m not driving.

Mrs Miggins on duty

Mrs Miggins on duty

Colin at Port Solent

Colin at Port Solent, ear in wind vane mode

We stopped at Port Solent en route…masses of free motorhome parking…to give the Krays a run before embarking.

Gulls Flying Backwards

Gulls Flying Backwards

It was seriously windy; the seagulls were flying backwards. A large flock of Canada geese were more sensible and had chosen to walk not fly.

The Car Hold

The Car Hold

We boarded the ferry at about 2.30 pm for the six hour crossing and followed this smart old Ford up the ramp.

We went over on the Brittany Ferries Portsmouth-Caen route. The ferry was bang on schedule despite the weather. We like this line. Being French the food is always good. We sat in the forward cafeteria, scoffing a guinea fowl casserole avec frites, and watched the waves crashing over the bow.

HMS Victory

HMS Victory

The ferry leaves port past the Historic Dockyard. HMS Victory, Nelson’s flagship, is just behind a more modern warship and to it’s left is the building housing the Mary Rose. This was Henry VIII’s flagship, rescued from the Solent mud where she had lain since sinking in 1545.

HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior was the first British steam powered warship…they kept the masts in case of engine failure. She never saw action.

wave1

Wave2

Wave3

After a big wave.

After a big wave.

The decks were closed due to the inclement sea conditions and we spent a while wave watching over lunch. Every so often a particularly large wave rolled the boat and a tremendous crash came from the kitchens; they need to invest in some gimbals. One mega large wave tipped me back out of my chair (no…I hadn’t been drinking…thanks for asking). Rather than helping me up, Mrs Miggins insisted that I hung on while she composed my photograph…never mind that I looked like a prize idiot. Luckily the cafeteria was almost empty.

Mont St Michel

Mont St Michel, our ferry loading for the trip back

We parked at Ouistreham aire for the night. There is a good walk on Sword beach for the Krays here.

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Posted in - France, - United Kingdom, 2016 Spring, Caen, Lower Normandy, Portsmouth

Christopher’s Pitch

Olive Bashing

Olive Bashing

In the Nets with Rick

In the Nets with Rick

After giving Mathilde and Rick a little help with their olive harvest, and laden down with freshly pressed olive oil, we moved a little further north to spend a couple of days at a campsite close to the centre of Córdoba.

Cordoba

Cordoba

The tiny streets of the old town lend themselves to exploration on bike.

Cycling through Córdoba

Cycling through Córdoba

And there are good cycleways leading in the town.

Convent of La Merced

Convent of La Merced

This old convent, its elegant facade dating from 1745 is on the route in to town. It is now used as an administrative centre.

Gardens of the Merced

Gardens of the Merced

Women of Cordoba

Women of Cordoba

There is a large park by the convent, with a statue dedicated to the women of Córdoba.

Plaza Doblas

Plaza Doblas

This is the pretty little Plaza Doblas, just beyond the gardens of the Merced.

Nia

Nia

We swung on into town, heading towards a Roman temple. The temple is just beyond the town hall where we passed a small but vocal demonstration.

Trade Union Meeting

Trade Union Meeting

Demonstrators

Demonstrators

I think these guys need a new contract. Quickly.

Greek Temple

Roman Temple

These are the remains of a temple dedicated to a Roman emperor…sorry don’t know which one.

Jesus of the Lamps

Jesus of the Lamps

There are many shrines and other religious statues throughout the old city.

Plaza Corredera

Plaza Corredera

A little further on is the handsome Plaza de Corredara, from the 17th century. This is a good coffee stop, wide enough for the tables on the side to be in full sun for most of the day…yes the sun is getting a bit low in the sky now…summer must be coming to an end.

Practise your Spanish

Practise your Spanish here

There are a few touristy shops scattered around…anyone else out there learning Spanish? I didn’t buy this…don’t want to upset the Missus.

Bridge Gate

Bridge Gate

After coffee we cycled past the Bridge Gate. Originally it served as a gate for the Roman bridge just beyond.

Triumph of Saint Raphael

Triumph of Saint Raphael

Saint Raphael is the protector of Córdoba. This statue in his honour, by the French artist Verdiguier in 1765, stands next to the Bridge gate.

Bishop's Palace

Bishop’s Palace

Horses and carriages are drawn up next to the Bishop’s palace, over the road from the Mezquita, ready to ferry visitors around.

Next stop the stunning Alcazar…the Palace of the Catholic Kings.

The Tower of the Lions

The Tower of the Lions

The Alcazar is a palace close to the Mezquita, on the north bank of the Guadalquivir. For many centuries it has been a temporary residence for Spanish royalty. The palace is most closely linked to Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand, who spent much time here, where they planned the reconquest of Granada from the Moors. After this period, the palace became centre of operations for the Spanish Inquisition, until the early 1800’s.

Under Moorish rule, the Alcazar was the site of extensive public baths, traces of which still remain.

The palace itself was enclosed by four towers, three of which remain, and high fortified walls.

Roman Sarcophagus

Roman Sarcophagus

On view inside are a collection of relics including this Roman sarcophagus, intricately carved with reliefs of philosophers. Useful companions for the trip to the underworld.

Polyphemus and Galatea

Polyphemus and Galatea

There is an impressive collection of well-preserved Roman mosaics, dug up from underneath the Plaza Carretera, where we had had coffee previously. This depicts the attempted seduction of Galatea by the cyclops Polyphemus, Neptune’s brother.

Roman Bridge and Calahorra Tower from Alcazar

Roman Bridge and Calahorra Tower from Alcazar

There are good views of the Mezquita and the Roman Bridge from the towers of the Alcazar.

On the Battlements leading to the Tower of Homage.

On the Battlements leading to the Tower of Homage.

Alcazar Gardens

Alcazar Gardens

The palace has extensive and attractive gardens. These spread around two sets of pools and include fruit groves and innumerable walkways through lines of trees and hedges.

Gardens of the Alcazar

Gardens of the Alcazar

Alcazar Palace

Alcazar Palace

Alcazar Gardens

Alcazar Gardens

Alcazar Gardens

Alcazar Gardens

The Pitch

The Pitch

There are many statues dotted around. This one depicts Christopher Columbus pitching his exploration schemes to Isabella and Ferdinand, in the hope of getting some backing. Distracted by their campaigns against the Moors they weren’t initially receptive but eventually agreed to fund him. The rest, as they say, is history.

Ferdinand the Just

Alphonse XI..the Just

This is King Alphonse, who set out to build the Alcazar, in the early 1300’s, to be both his home and a military fortress.

La Albolafia Mill

La Albolafia Mill

This is the Albolafia Mill, built by the Moors to lift water up from the river to water the gardens by their baths on the site of the Alcazar. It was ordered to be stopped by Queen Isabella because the noise disturbed her sleep. I bet she was high maintenance.

Water Mill

Water Mill

Saint Raphael on the Roman Bridge

Saint Raphael on the Roman Bridge

With night falling we cycled on to the bridge for some final shots of St Raphael as he kept watch over Córdoba.

It is time to start heading back north now…this may be the last post.

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Posted in - Spain, Andalucia, Autumn 2015, Córdoba

Córdoba

We took the bus from La Campiña to Cordoba (€4 each, 45 minutes) while Rick very kindly looked after the Kray twins.

Calahorra Tower

Calahorra Tower

Time was limited so we took a taxi from the bus station to the Calahorrra tower, which lies to the south of the River Guadalquivir. The tower is directly across the Roman Bridge from the Mezquita-Cathedral, the cathedral within a mosque which is one of the buildings for which Córdoba is famous.

The tower was built by Henry II, who we had met earlier in the tour when we lunched with Alan and Joy overlooking his birthplace in Le Mans.

Early surgical Instruments

Early surgical Instruments

There is a good museum inside the tower, established by the ‘Foundation of Dialogue Among Cultures’ and showing the time of the tolerant Córdoba of the Caliphate, when Moors, Christians and Jews lived peacefully together. For many centuries Córdoba was a great intellectual and scientific centre. In Roman times great poets and philosophers including Seneca and Lucano lived here.
It was under Moorish domination, after 929, when an independent caliphate was declared, that Córdoba became one of the most important cultural centres in the west. The city housed a famous university, libraries and much sumptuous architecture, some of which has survived.

Roman Bridge

Roman Bridge

From the Calahorra tower there are good views across the Roman Bridge (modernised but with Roman foundations) to the Mezquita and old city.

Mosque and Cathedral

Mosque and Cathedral

The mosque in Córdoba, covering 24,000 square metres, is the largest in the Western world.

Mosque Doorway on West Side

Mosque Doorway on West Side

The imposing mosque walls are studded with square turrets and contain many ornate gates.

Orangery

Orangery

To the west of the mosque is a garden planted with a grid of oranges, cunningly kept watered by a grid of rills or water channels running from tree to tree. In Moorish times the faithful washed here before entering the mosque.

Bell tower of cathedral

Bell tower of cathedral

In 1236 Córdoba was reconquered by the Christian armies of Ferdinand the Holy and over subsequent centuries a cathedral and bell tower was built within the mosque, preserving much of the original Moorish building.

The Mosque

The Mosque

Aisles and Archways in the original Mosque

Aisles and Archways in the original Mosque

The mosque was started by Abd-ar-Rahman I in 786. There is a stunning interior of bi-colour arches on two levels. The columns were pinched from Visigoth and Roman buildings in Spain, Europe and North Africa, making the mosque a museum of first millennium architecture.

Interior Arch

Interior Arch

The Cathedral

The Cathedral

A sumptuous cathedral has been built within the mosque, which was consecrated and named Santa Maria la Mayor a few weeks after the conquest by Ferdinand the Holy in 1236. Up to the 16th century, further additions and changes to the architecture were made; cathedral construction began in 1523.

Choir Stalls

Choir Stalls

Choir Stalls

Choir Stalls

The seats have been carved in Antilles mahogany and feature scenes from the Bible and the lives of various Córdoban martyrs.

There is a massive organ within the cathedral and we were treated to a stunning rendition of Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor while we were there.

After the cathedral we moved to the Jewish quarter for a tapas lunch, then walked back to the bus station. There is much more to see in Córdoba and we are planning to return.

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Posted in - Spain, Andalucia, Autumn 2015, Córdoba

The Olive Harvest

Mavis In La Campiña

Mavis In La Campiña

We have discovered the best campsite in Spain…it is La Campiña, a smallish site tucked away in the Andalucian olive groves about 20 miles south of Córdoba.

Andalucia

Andalucia

The name La Campiña translates as a region of rolling hills and fertile land.

La Campiña

La Campiña

The site is run by Mathilde, originally from Madrid who came here aged seven when her parents started the campsite, and her husband Rik, from Holland.

Malc and Carel

Malc and Carel

Malc and Carel, two fellow motorhomers and friends of Rik and Mathilde. The six of us shared home-cooked paella the day after we arrived.

On Saturday we walked down in to the Olive Groves which surround the campsite to meet the olive pickers; after a dry few weeks the harvest has started.

Ripening.

Ripening.

Black or green, they are all picked at the same time. The fruit here goes to the local processing unit to be turned in to olive oil.

The Nets

The Nets

First the ground is covered in nets, then a tractor comes along with a tree shaking attachment (don’t see many of those in Cumbria) and shakes quite a lot of the olives on to the nets.

Stripping the Olives

Stripping the Olives

Then a team of men with electric forks…clever devices with reciprocating tines…strip out any fruit still attached.

The Team

The Team

What a friendly bunch….as soon as we pitched up they formed up into a line for a photograph.

Picking up the Nets

Picking up the Nets

This guy picks up the nets and pulls the olives into a big hopper on the front of one of the tractors.

Olive Hopper

Olive Hopper

The Olive Groves

The Olive Groves

As soon as the hopper is full it gets decanted into a bigger trailer.

You will meet the olives again, a bit later in this post.

At the weekend, we cycled through the olives to San Sebastian de Los Ballesteros for wine and tapas.

Ready for planting

Ready for planting

There has been a long dry spell and the farmers are waiting for rain before they plant for next year.

Cafe in San Sebastian

Cafe in San Sebastian

 Santaella

Santaella

On Monday Mathilde drove us to Santaella, the quiet town close by, which has been the centre of this agricultural region for many centuries.

As with much of Andalucia the town was a Moorish settlement at the beginning of the last millennium. The minaret by the church at the top of the town marks the site of the old mosque.

Minaret

Minaret

Bishops's Crest

Bishops’s Crest

Bishops's Crest

Another Bishops’s Crest

We looked round the church which was built around the mosque in the 1400’s. There are many different coats of arms around the church, each representing a different Bishop of Córdoba and reflecting the long time spent converting the architecture to a form which the catholics here would be comfortable with.

Old Arabic Gilded Wooden Roof

Old Arabic Gilded Wooden Roof

There is a very well preserved roof from Arabic times.

Santaella Church...Arabic Flooring

Santaella Church…Arabic Flooring

And much other evidence, such as this tiling in 8 pointed stars, of the Moorish origins of the building.

Procession Figures

Procession Figures

Every Easter there is a week of processions, and these figures of Jesus, Saint Mary and other saints are carried round the streets for all to see.

For Processions

For Processions

This is the ceremonial coffin, carried by 16 men under the covers, which carries the figure of Jesus on the Easter processions. Apparently there is generally also a bottle of brandy or two, hidden beneath the draperies, to sustain the figure bearers.

Town Hall Santaella

Town Hall Santaella

Mathilde took us on a tour around Santaella.

Santaella

Terrace of Circle de Labradores

Next to the Town Hall is the Circulo de Labradores or ‘Working Man’s Club’, built by the landowners for their workers. In the event however it was used in the old days mainly by the land owners….the workers were too busy working to use it…

It is now a cafe and we went in for coffee. There is a terrace much decorated by ceramic pictures and poetry, supplied by a group of local artists and writers who used to meet here.

Church/Minaret at Santaella

Church/Minaret at Santaella

Terrace for los Labraderos

Terrace for los Labraderos

Coffee in Santaella

Ready for the Coffee

Mathilde and Peter in Santaella

Mathilde and Peter in Santaella

Garlic Factory

Garlic Factory

After Santaella, Mathilde took us to Montalbano de Córdoba. This is another small town, about 10 km from La Campiña. First stop was a quick look around a garlic processing plant, where we tasted black garlic…bulbs which have been heated enough to preserve them and produce a dark, crumbly texture. Delicious.

Pedro Ximenez Bodega

Pedro Ximenez Bodega

Next stop was the Bodegas del Pino in Montalban where they turn locally grown Pedro Ximenez grapes into a variety of delicious wines. They make a sweet dessert wine here which is particularly nice.

The picture above shows the old grape presses.

Tasting from the Vats

Tasting from the Vats

Yummy

Yummy

Mathilde

Mathilde

More Tasting

More Tasting

We had to try some more…it would have been rude not to.

Olive Oil Works

Olive Oil Works

We moved on to an olive oil processing plant to see what happened to the olives we had seen picked a few days before.

Olives

Olives

First the olives are tipped in to a big hopper.

Olives on the way in

Olives on the way in

Olives on the way to being washed and de-leafed

Olives on the way to being washed and de-leafed

The olives are conveyor-belted up, blown (to remove the leaves ) then washed.

Centrifuges

Centrifuges

After crushing, the paste is centrifuged to separate out the oil.

First Press

First Press

This is the end product; a lovely bubbling geyser of first press, milky, extra virgin olive oil.

Tasting the First Press

Tasting the First Press

Mathilde had bought some bread and we dunked it in the fresh oil and scoffed away. Absolutely delicious.

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Posted in Autumn 2015, Santaella

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Bells of Iglesia Padre Jesus

Bells of Iglesia Padre Jesus

Lady Tennyson

Lady Tennyson

Following in the footsteps of Ernest Hemingway, Orson Welles, Tennyson and a few other tourists, we have just spent four days in Ronda…an amazing town perched on top of sheer cliffs, deep in Andalucia. We stayed at Camping El Sur, a good site about a mile to the south of the town. It is quick to walk or cycle in…the old town is about 20 minutes walk away.

Puerta de Almocabar

Puertas de Almocabar and Carlos V

Occupied since neolithic times, the town was a Moor (Muslim) stronghold for many centuries. These are the gates through which you enter the old town from the campsite direction. Just behind the walls here is the church of the Holy Ghost.

Altar...Church of the Holy Ghost

Altar…Church of the Holy Ghost

For a euro you can walk into the Church and climb the tower on its south wall.

View From Church of Holy Ghost

View From Church of Holy Ghost

There is a good view of the Almocabar and Carlos V gates and walls from the tower.

Good Coffee Stop

Good Coffee Stop

Jardin de la Muralla

Jardin de la Muralla

Just past the church, hidden around a corner, is this small cafe, with a delightful terrace and great views over the countryside.

Jardin de la Muralla

Jardin de la Muralla

Perfect for the first coffee stop of the day.

Puente Nuevo..the new bridge

Puente Nuevo..the new bridge

Ronda is split in two by the El Tajo gorge which divides the old town in the south from the Mercadillo, or market town, to the north. This is the new bridge (new is relative…built in the 18th century), which joins the two towns.

El Tajo Gorge

El Tajo Gorge

The River Guadalevin runs through the El Tajo gorge….this is the gorge to the east of Ronda.

Casa de San Juan Bosco

Casa de San Juan Bosco

One of the many old houses worth visiting is that of San Juan Bosco, on the west side of the old city. There are elegant interiors and a pretty terrace, much be-tiled in an Islamic style, with stunning views over the gorge to El Mercadillo and the surrounding countryside.

Bosco Terrace

Bosco Terrace

Terrace at Casa Bosco

Terrace at Casa Bosco

Casa Bosco

Casa Bosco

Hemingway

Hemingway

Hemingway’s bust adorns the plaza just by the bullring over the bridge in the Mercadillo. He spent much time in the old city and based his novel ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’ on events here in the Spanish Civil War.

Iglesia del Socorro

Iglesia del Socorro

A little further on from Hemingway is the Plaza de Socorro, home to this elegant church and a number of restaurants…it’s a good place to sit and refuel.

Lunch at Casino Restaurant

Lunch at Casino Restaurant

The Casino restaurant overlooks the Plaza Socorro.

Plaza del Socorro

Plaza del Socorro

This handy pigeon perch is on the Plaza de Socorro.

Ice Cream Time

Ice Cream Time

Also a good spot for an ice cream. And a lie down, if you are a terrier with old town overload.

Eugen

Eugen

This is Eugen, brilliant spanish guitarist who played on the Plaza Maria Auxiliadora, close to the Bosco house, while we rehydrated in the cafe here. We bought some of his CD’s to remind us of the trip.

Restaurant Casino ..Accompaniment

Restaurant Casino ..Accompaniment

Another local musician; he was playing in the Restaurant Casino, on the Plaza Socorro.

Eco Transport

Eco Transport

This seemed a civilised way to get around. We hopped aboard one of the carriages for a leisurely drive around the old town.

Lady Nia in her charabanc

Lady Nia in her charabanc

The last time we were on one of these together was our wedding day. (Before any one comments…this wasn’t because we were married before the internal combustion engine had appeared).

Viewpoint

Viewpoint

This is the viewpoint in El Mercadillo, just behind the bullring and close to a good woody bit to let the Krays off in. There are good views over the gorge and live music each time we walked by…harp and pan pipes today, accordion yesterday.

Arab Baths

Arab Baths

There is a good walk down from the Jardins de la Muralla coffee stop, outside the town’s walls, to the Arab baths to the east of the old town. Built on the site of preexisting Roman baths, the sophisticated hot pools were for the use of travellers before they entered the town.

The Krays

The Krays

Colin and Penny weren’t allowed in to the baths; we took it in turns to go in. Pity…Penny would have loved to dig up some old Roman bones.

Arab Bridge, Arab baths behind.

Arab Bridge, Arab baths behind.

Just next to the baths is the Arab Bridge (also known as the Roman bridge) to El Mercadillo, at a much lower level than the New Bridge.

The Old Bridge

The Old Bridge

This is the old bridge, just above the Arab Bridge (confused yet?..we were).

Palace of the Moorish King...Gardens

Palace of the Moorish King…Gardens

Palace of the Moorish King...Gardens

Palace of the Moorish King…Gardens

Walking up from the Old Bridge, on the Old Town side of the gorge, you come to the Palace of the Moorish King and Gardens. The palace is closed for renovations but the garden is worth a visit, as is the ‘water mine’ which is a vertical shaft sunk down from the gardens to the river 80 m or so below. 300 steps lead down to the water and provided a water supply in times of siege.

Water Mine

Water Mine

Slaves on the steps formed a human chain to pass water bags up to the thirsty townspeople.

From the Foot of the Water Mine

From the Foot of the Water Mine

Walking down the steps you eventually come out, not unexpectedly, at the foot of the gorge.

Cafe Goyesca

Cafe Goyesca

This is the Restaurant Goyesca, close to the Place of the Moorish King, and home to some excellent tapas.

Tapas

Tapas

More Tapas

More Tapas

Even more Tapas

Even more Tapas

Tapas again

Tapas again

Xijara Walls

Xijara Walls

Another good walk is along the Xijara walls to the east of the old town.

Xijara Gate

Xijara Gate

The gate is in the Moorish style.

We have eaten so many tapas that we won’t be able to get through any more gates if we stay any longer, so we are moving on now, in the direction of Cordoba.

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Posted in - Spain, Andalucia, Autumn 2015, Ronda

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